25 West 64th Street

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25 West 64th Street, New York City, NY

25 West 64th Street
25w64-nyc-exterior.jpg

Exterior of 25 West 64th Street
Building Information
Number of Units 53
Number of Floors 9
Year Built 1922
Construction Method Concrete
Type of Roof IRMA
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25 West 64th Street, New York City, NY
Distance to Public Transit Within one block
Region New York City
Municipality New York City
Zoning R8
Title of Land Cooperative


Contents

Background

Street View of 25 West 64th Street

25 West 64th Street is a charming nine story red brick building that was constructed in 1922. Situated on the block east of Lincoln Square, which is home to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and its 29 different performance theaters, residents at this building are very close to daily amenities and entertainment.

This well-maintained, private building is known to be a peaceful cooperative residence with 53 units and a friendly community. This elevator building consists of studios and one bedroom layouts that feature pre-war detailing that includes hardwood floors and high, beamed ceilings.

There building offers a common laundry room, bike storage and intercom security as well as a live-in superintendent. This building does not allow pets and has no doorman or concierge but does offer a landscaped courtyard.[1]


Location

Situated just to the block east of Lincoln Square, which is still considered the Lincoln Square neighborhood, 25 West 64th Street offers a sought-after location nearby entertainment, theater performances, restaurants, cafes, and markets.

The residences is one block away from the highly-visited tourist attraction of Central Park, and is also within walking distance to many other outdoor areas that include Josie Robertson Plaza, Milstein Plaza, Damrosch Park, and Columbus Circle.

Nearby Schools include York Preparatory School, Special Music School, Fiorello H Laguardia High School, High School of Arts and Technology, and Manhattan/Hunter Science High School. There are over 50 different public transportation routes nearby. There is a metro subway station one block away at Lincoln Center, and there are also car and bike share programs within walking distance.

Public transportation is convenient and varied as it is close to the A,C,1,B and D trains at Columbus Circle as well as the cross-town bus at 66th Street and Central Park West. The Time Warner Center is located at nearby Columbus Circle with multiple levels of shopping, fine restaurants and the Whole Foods grocery store.[2]

Construction

Full Front View of 25 West 64th Street
Facade View of 25 West 64th Street

Built on a 5,021 square foot lot, 25 West 64th Street is a nine story, 27.56 meter tall building that encompasses a total size of 33,492 square feet. With an attractive red brick facade, this classic building was completed in 1922 and features white terracotta detailing at its exterior.

The front facade also has two attractive terracotta string-courses, one of which is at the top of the second level which provides a slight overhang and visually distinguishes the base of the building from its remainder. The second string-course is situated between the eighth and the ninth level. Arched window detailing is found at the penthouse level as well as the exterior windows at the third level.

Terracotta detailing also surrounds the street-level lobby entrance. The brick exterior facade changes color to a lighter, softer red at the eighth and ninth levels, whereas the remainder of the exterior is a vibrant, rustic red. This simple architectural, pre-war building offers many columns of windows at its exterior, a flat roof-line, and no balconies.[3]

Layout and Features

The studio and one bedroom layouts offered at 25 West 64th Street offers their original herringbone hardwood floors, French doors, 10 foot beamed ceilings, and plenty of windows and natural light. Many of the kitchens are eat-in kitchens with windows, and many have been updated with stainless steel appliances and new lighting.

Many of the bathrooms are also windowed. Some of the bathrooms offer their original porcelain fixtures and tile surrounds, while some have been updated with more modern finishes.

Some of the layouts offer entrance foyers and formal dining rooms, while many of them are quite modest and quaint in size. The building has been updated with energy-efficient, double-pane windows that are also soundproof. The building offers an updated security system as well with video intercom.[4]

Floor Plans

There are nine floor plans available for 25 West 64th Street. Here is a brief overview.


Amenities

Amenities offered at 25 West 64th Street include:

  • Doorman
  • Live-in Superintendent
  • Bike Room
  • Common Laundry
  • Landscaped Courtyard

Bylaws

25 West 64th Street Bylaws
Rentals Yes
Pets No
Age No


  • Pets are not allowed
  • Rentals are allowed
  • There are no age restrictions

Sustainability

The interiors, by their design, offer energy-efficient features in their many windows which allow for plenty of natural light to enter the spaces. Some of the interiors at 25 West 64th Street have been updated with energy-efficient features that include:

  • Energy Star appliances
  • Energy-efficient, soundproof windows
  • Sustainable hardwood and stone materials

The building is constructed of sustainable concrete and brick materials, which are durable and long-lasting. The many nearby public transportation routes and car and bike share programs in the area encourage the residents in the building to take advantage of eco-friendly transport.

Trivia

Avery Fisher Hall Auditorium

One of the prominent theaters at the nearby Lincoln Square, and one of which makes up the 29 venues at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, is the Avery Fisher Hall.

Designed by architect Max Abramovitz, Avery Fisher Hall was opened in 1962 Philharmonic Hall. First as the new home concert of the Philharmonic, after the orchestra moved from Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall was later renamed and now offers a concert hall with a capacity of 2,738 seats. The hall was renamed after its 10.5 million dollar donation to the orchestra in 1973.

There are undergoing renovation plans to Avery Fisher Hall, in which the shell of the building will be left intact and renovations will be extensive to improve the hall’s lackluster acoustics. This will include replacing amenities and re-configuring the auditorium to be more acoustic. After the renovation is complete, which is set to start in 2017, the auditorium is expected to be a major renaming opportunity for a donor.[5]

References

  1. Street Easy
  2. Walk Score
  3. Manhattan Scout
  4. Trulia
  5. Wikipedia


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