2 Beekman Place

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2 Beekman Place, New York City, NY

2 Beekman Place
2beekman-nyc-exterior.jpg

Exterior of 2 Beekman Place
Building Information
Developer H. Lane Ogle and Nellie Lane Ogle
Architect Rosario Candela
Management Company Tudor Realty Services Corp.
Number of Units 104
Number of Floors 17
Year Built 1932
Construction Method Concrete
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2 Beekman Place, New York City, NY
Distance to Public Transit Within one block
Region New York City
Municipality New York City
Zoning R8B
Title of Land Cooperative


Contents

Background

Street View of 2 Beekman Place

This 18-story apartment house comprised of 104 coop apartments at 2 Beekman Place was designed by Rosario Candela and built by H. Lane Ogle and Nellie Lane Ogle in 1932. The building, also known as 15-19 Mitchell Place, has a one-story, rusticated limestone base and an entrance canopy with a two-story limestone entrance. The brown-brick building features many terraces on its top four floors as well as duplex apartments, an 8-room triplex penthouse and a roof deck. The doorman building is pet friendly and has private storage spaces. It is across 49th Street/Mitchell Place from the twin-towered 860-870 United Nations Plaza at the north end of the gardens of the United Nations Complex. Beekman Place is a short street with some interesting townhouses and is not far from Sutton Place.

This attractive, 18-story cooperative apartment house at 2 Beekman Place was designed by Rosario Candela and built by H. Lane Ogle and Nellie Lane Ogle in 1932. The building has 104 apartments.


An attractive, brown-brick, pre-war apartment building at the quite handsome corner of Mitchell Place and Beekman Place.


[1]



Location

It is across 49th Street/Mitchell Place from the twin-towered 860-870 United Nations Plaza at the north end of the gardens of the United Nations Complex. It is also across Beekman Place from the very handsome pre-war apartment building at 1 Beekman Place. Beekman Place is a short street with some interesting townhouses and it is not far from Sutton Place.

[2]


Construction

Base of 2 Beekman Place

The building has a one-story, rusticated limestone base and an entrance canopy with a two-story limestone entrance surround. It is also known as 15-19 Mitchell Place. The brown-brick building has numerous terraces on its top four floors, some of which are partially angled and its roof-top watertank enclosure had thin center piers. The building has multi-paned windows and many protruding air-conditioners and its masonry façade has been redone often enough for it to appear as if it almost has a very intricate and interesting pattern. The building has a few rounded balconies that give a nice modulation to the façade.


[3]


Layout and Features

Prestigious Rosario Candela designed, Pre-War white-gloved doorman building. This apartment just completed a meticulous total gut renovation, XXX Mint. Beautiful pre-war details throughout. Features include a renovated gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops, stunning modern marble bath, custom designed closets, beamed ceilings, hardwood floors. Apartment faces East over Beekman Place with beautiful treetop views. The building features 24 hour door and elevator worker, a designated storage unit, and a lovely, landscaped roof garden with spectacular city and river views. Pets allowed with board approval. Pied-a-Terre permitted. Also available for rent. Apartment Features: East exposure, Prewar detail, Beamed ceiling, Floors - hardwood, Modern kitchen, Renovated bathroom, Great closet space Building Features: Courtyard, Roof deck

Apartments have eat-in kitchens. There are some duplex apartments and an 8-room triplex penthouse. Apartment 17A is a two-bedroom unit that has a 9-foot-wide entry foyer that opens on one side to a 21-foot-long living room with a terrace and a wood-burning fireplace and on the other to a 16-foot-long dining room next to a 16-foot-long enclosed kitchen. Apartment 15B is a one-bedroom unit that has an 18-foot-long entrance foyer that leads past an 18-foot-wide kitchen and an 18-foot-wide home office to a 9-foot-long gallery to a 22-foot-long family room with a fireplace and two terraces. The apartment also has a 17-foot-long library and a 12-foot-long staff room. Apartment 4B has an entrance foyer that leads to a 19-foot-long living room that opens onto a 16-foot-long library and also has sliding doors to a 16-foot-long dining room next to an enclosed 14-foot-long kitchen. The apartment also has a 17-foot-long family room and two bedrooms. Apartment 6G had a small entry foyer that opens onto a 20-foot-long living area next to a small enclosed kitchen and a 15-foot-long bedroom. Apartment 3G has a small entry foyer that opens onto a 29-foot-long living area with a bootleg-angled kitchen and a 9-foot-wide sleeping alcove. Apartment 3C is a two-bedroom unit with a 13-foot-wide entry foyer that leads to a 22-loot-long living room facing Beekman Place and a kitchen with a dining alcove. Apartment 9E is a two-bedroom unit with a 13-foot-wide entry foyer that leads to a 22-foot-long living room in one direction and a 17-foot-long kitchen with a dining alcove in the other.

There is a roof deck and an elevator person as well as a doorman and private storage spaces. The building is pet friendly.

[4]

Floor Plans

There are 30 floor plans available for 2 Beekman Place. Here is a brief overview.


Amenities

Amenities offered at 2 Beekman Place include:

  • Doorman
  • Elevator
  • On-site Storage
  • Common Roof Deck

Bylaws

2 Beekman Place Bylaws
Rentals Yes or No
Pets Yes or No
Age Yes or No
Barbecues Yes or No


2 Beekman Place is managed by Tudor Realty Services: (212) 557-3600.


Sustainability

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Trivia

The Beekman House in 1860

Beekman Place is a small side-street located in Turtle Bay south of the Queensborough Bridge. The street extends from north to south for two blocks and is situated between 51st Street and 49th Street. Beekman Place also refers to the surrounding residential neighborhood as a whole, and is named after the Beekman Family. They were an influential family in the early development of New York City, and the neighborhood was also the site of the Beekman family mansion, which was called Mount Pleasant. The mansion was built by James Beekman in 1765.

The British made their headquarters in the mansion for a time during the American Revolutionary War and Nathan Hale was tried as a spy in the mansion's greenhouse and hanged in a nearby orchard. George Washington visited the house many times during his presidency. The Beekman family lived at Mount Pleasant until a cholera epidemic forced them to move in 1854. The home survived until 1874 when it was torn down. With the surge of immigration from Europe in the late 19th and early 20th century, the Lower East Side's slums expanded north. The Beekman Place area's well-off residents gave way to impoverished workers employed in the coalyards that lined much of the East River shore. The neighborhood's rehabilitation began in the 1920s, facilitated primarily by Anne Morgan of the Morgan banking family,[2] who lived slightly farther north on Sutton Place. One Beekman Place, the 1929 co-op designed by Sloan & Robertson and Corbett, Harrison & MacMurray, is "the most prestigious Beekman Place apartment building," according to Carter Horsley. It was built by a group headed by David Milton, husband of Abby Rockefeller and son-in-law of John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Early tenants here included "Wild Bill" Donovan of the OSS, John D. Rockefeller III,[3] Prince Aly Khan, A&P Heir Huntington Hartford and Happy Rockefeller lived at One Beekman Place. It has a lavish tiled pool on the ground floor for the tenants and a basketball court and small ping pong table. In the book, movie, and musical Auntie Mame, the title character lives at 3 Beekman Place. In the novel and movie Bonfire of the Vanities, the mayor mentions Beekman Place, saying: "They sit in their co-ops, Park Avenue, Fifth, Beekman Place, snug like a bug. Twelve-foot ceilings, a wing for them, one for the help". In the movie The Way We Were, Beekman Place symbolizes the Waspish cultural background of Hubbell Gardiner (Robert Redford's character) that is a continual irritant in his relationship with the Marxist Jew Katie Morosky (played by Barbra Steisand)

[6]

References

  1. Street Easy
  2. STORYTELLERCAPTION
  3. City Realty
  4. Blocksy
  5. STORYTELLERCAPTION
  6. Wikipedia


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